Friday, October 12, 2012

AR 1589, Most Active for October 11th...


The above image was taken October 11th at 08:04:00 UTC by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), at 131 Angstroms, aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). This was at the time of a C4 x-ray flare near the northeast (upper-left) limb, produced by Active Region 1589 (AR 1589). Image Credit: SDO/AIA

For the end of October 10th and most of October 11th, the solar activity was low. Active Region 1589 (AR 1589), in the northeast quadrant, was responsible for the largest flare of the period; a C4 x-ray flare on the 11th at 08:04 UTC. AR 1589 is currently the most complex region, with a Beta-Gamma magnetic classification. New region AR New Region 1590 rotated onto the southeast limb and was numbered.  No Earth-directed coronal mass ejections were observed. The forecast through October 14th: The solar activity is expected to be low with a chance for isolated M-class activity.

Here at home, the geomagnetic field was quiet.  Solar wind speed, measured at the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft, was slightly elevated between approximately 440 to 500 km/s while the Bz component of the interplanetary magnetic field did not vary much beyond +/- 4 nT. The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit was at high levels throughout the period. The forecast through October 14th: The geomagnetic field is expected to be mostly quiet on 12th and 13th. On the 14th, a coronal hole high-speed stream is expected to move into geoeffective position, causing quiet to unsettled conditions with a chance for active periods. Stay tuned...

To monitor solar flare activity minute by minute, visit the "Today's Space Weather" page of NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center (www.swpc.noaa.gov/today.html).

To learn more about the sun and to stay current on solar activity, visit the mission home pages of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) (sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov), the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) (sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov), the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) (www.srl.caltech.edu/ACE), and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) (stereo.gsfc.nasa.gov).

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Thursday, October 11, 2012

Sol Giving Low-to-Moderate Activity...


The above image was taken October 10th at 05:04:00 UTC by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), at 94 Angstroms, aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). This was at the time of an M1 x-ray flare just beyond the southeastern (lower-left) limb, produced by a yet-to-be-designated region. Image Credit: SDO/AIA

For the end of October 9th and most of October 10th, the solar activity was moderate. A pair of M1 x-ray events were produced on the 9th at 23:31 UTC and on the 10th at 05:04 UTC by a new region which has not yet rotated around the southeast limb. Active Region 1589 (AR 1589), in the northeastern quadrant, remains the largest and most complex group on the solar disk. The forecast through October 13th: The solar activity is expected to be low with the chance for moderate levels.

Above Earth, the geomagnetic field began the period at minor storm conditions, due to the onset of a coronal hole high-speed stream coupled with residual and lingering coronal mass ejection (CME) effects. Mostly quiet conditions then followed and continued for the remainder of the period. The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit reached high levels during the period. The forecast through October 13th: The geomagnetic field is expected to be quiet to unsettled with isolated active levels on the 11th, as coronal hole effects continue. Mostly quiet conditions are forecast for the 12th and 13th. Stay tuned...

To monitor solar flare activity minute by minute, visit the "Today's Space Weather" page of NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center (www.swpc.noaa.gov/today.html).

To learn more about the sun and to stay current on solar activity, visit the mission home pages of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) (sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov), the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) (sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov), the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) (www.srl.caltech.edu/ACE), and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) (stereo.gsfc.nasa.gov).

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Sunday, October 07, 2012

B-Class Events from AR 1585...


The above X-ray image of the sun was taken October 7th at 02:44:00 UTC by the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) aboard the GOES-15 satellite. Image Credit: NOAA

For the end of October 5th and most of October 6th, the solar activity has been at very low levels. Active Region 1585 (AR 1585), in the southeastern quadrant, has been the most active region, producing multiple B-class events. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were observed. The forecast through October 9th: The solar activity is expected to be at very low to low levels.

Here at home, the geomagnetic field has been at predominantly quiet levels. Solar wind speeds, as measured by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft, remain at nominal levels. Even so, energetic particle measurements by the EPAM sensor, indicate a CME is currently traveling toward Earth. The forecast through October 9th: The geomagnetic field is expected to be at predominantly quiet levels on the 7th. An increase to unsettled to active levels with a chance for minor storm periods is expected on the 8th and 9th as the 05 October CME is forecasted to arrive.

To monitor solar flare activity minute by minute, visit the "Today's Space Weather" page of NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center (www.swpc.noaa.gov/today.html).

To learn more about the sun and to stay current on solar activity, visit the mission home pages of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) (sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov), the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) (sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov), the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) (www.srl.caltech.edu/ACE), and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) (stereo.gsfc.nasa.gov).

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Saturday, October 06, 2012

Partial Halo CME on October 5th!

The link below presents views of a partial halo coronal mass ejection (CME) using images on October 5th from 06:30:07 UTC through 11:47:19 UTC. The video is compiled of images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The video was prepared by helioviewer.org and posted to YouTube by contributor "otraLoly." Image Credit: SDO/AIA/SOHO

CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE VIDEO.

For the end of October 4th and most of October 5th, the solar activity was very low.  A long duration (7.5 hours) B7 x-ray event was observed on the 5th at 07:30 UTC. Post eruption loop structures were observed in GOES SXI imagery beginning at approximately 03:28 UTC in the vicinity of Active Region (AR 1584), in the southwest quadrant, shortly after the beginning of the B7 flare at 03:17 UTC. A partial halo coronal mass ejection (CME) was first observed in SOHO/LASCO C3 imagery at 07:30 UTC and STEREO A COR2 imagery at 04:09 UTC with an estimated plane-of-sky speed at 590 km/s. WSA-ENLIL model indicates this Earth-directed CME to become geoeffective late on the 8th. The forecast through October 8th: The solar activity is expected to continue at very low levels with the chance for a C-class flare.

Above Earth, the geomagnetic field was quiet. The forecast through October 8th: The geomagnetic field is expected to be mostly quiet on the 6th and 7th. Late on the 8th, today's CME is expected to affect Earth, causing unsettled to active conditions with a chance for minor storm periods. Stay tuned...

To monitor solar flare activity minute by minute, visit the "Today's Space Weather" page of NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center (www.swpc.noaa.gov/today.html).

To learn more about the sun and to stay current on solar activity, visit the mission home pages of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) (sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov), the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) (sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov), the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) (www.srl.caltech.edu/ACE), and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) (stereo.gsfc.nasa.gov).

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Friday, October 05, 2012

September 5th: More Sleepy Sol...


The above image was taken October 5th at 03:21:04 UTC by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), at 1700 Angstroms, aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The major sunspot groups visible in this image include Active Region 1585 (left), 1582 (right of center) and 1579 (right). Image Credit: SDO/AIA

For the end of October 3rd and most of October 4th, the solar activity was very low. The forecast through October 7th: The solar activity is expected to be very low with a chance for C-class flares.

Here at home, the geomagnetic field was quiet. The forecast through October 7th: The geomagnetic field is expected to be mostly quiet. Stay tuned...

To monitor solar flare activity minute by minute, visit the "Today's Space Weather" page of NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center (www.swpc.noaa.gov/today.html).

To learn more about the sun and to stay current on solar activity, visit the mission home pages of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) (sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov), the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) (sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov), the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) (www.srl.caltech.edu/ACE), and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) (stereo.gsfc.nasa.gov).

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Thursday, October 04, 2012

AR 1582 Visible to Naked Eye at Dawn and Dusk!


The above image was taken October 4th at 02:41:56 UTC by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), at 4500 Angstroms, aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The major sunspot groups visible in this image include Active Region 1585 (left), 1582 (right of center) and 1579 (right). Image Credit: SDO/AIA

We currently have some large sunspot groups. The largest of these is Active Region 1585 (AR 1585). This particular group is so large that it can be seen from Earth, at dawn and dusk, with just the naked eye!

For the end of October 2nd and most of October 3rd, the solar activity was very low. No significant activity occurred. The forecast through October 6th: The solar activity is expected to range from very low to low.

Above Earth, the geomagnetic field began the current UTC day with an isolated unsettled period due to an extended interval of negative Bz. Otherwise, the field was quiet. The forecast through October 6th: The geomagnetic field is expected to be mostly quiet. Stay tuned...

To monitor solar flare activity minute by minute, visit the "Today's Space Weather" page of NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center (www.swpc.noaa.gov/today.html).

To learn more about the sun and to stay current on solar activity, visit the mission home pages of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) (sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov), the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) (sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov), the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) (www.srl.caltech.edu/ACE), and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) (stereo.gsfc.nasa.gov).

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Wednesday, October 03, 2012

AR 1584's C1 Flare on October 2nd...


The above image was taken October 2nd at 09:04:00 UTC by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). This was during the time of a C1 solar flare, produced by Active Region 1584 (AR 1584), in the southeast (lower-left) quadrant. The displayed image combined the AIA observations at 94, 131, and 171 Angstroms. Image Credit: SDO/AIA

For the end of October 1st and most of october 2nd, the solar activity was low. Active Region 1584 (AR 1584) produced the largest event, a C1 solar flare on the 2nd at 09:04 UTC. And a new group, AR 1585 (in the southeast quadrant) was numbered. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were observed. The forecast through October 5th: The solar activity is expected to range from low to very low.

Here at home, the geomagnetic field was quiet. The forecast through October 5th: The geomagnetic field is expected to be mostly quiet. Stay tuned...

To monitor solar flare activity minute by minute, visit the "Today's Space Weather" page of NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center (www.swpc.noaa.gov/today.html).

To learn more about the sun and to stay current on solar activity, visit the mission home pages of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) (sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov), the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) (sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov), the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) (www.srl.caltech.edu/ACE), and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) (stereo.gsfc.nasa.gov).

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Tuesday, October 02, 2012

AR 1575's C9 Flare on Sept 30th...


The above image was taken September 30th at 23:39:00 UTC by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). This was during the time of a C9 solar x-ray event, produced by Active Region 1575 (AR 1575), beyond the western (right) limb. The displayed image combined the AIA observations at 94, 131, and 171 Angstroms. Image Credit: SDO/AIA

For the end of September 30th and most of October 1st, the solar activity was low. Active Region 1575 (AR 1575), which is now around the west limb, produced several C-class x-ray events, the greatest being a C9 on the 30th at 23:39 UTC. No Earth-directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were observed. The forecast through October 4th: The solar activity is expected to be low for the 2nd. Activity is expected to be very low to low on the 3rd and 4th, as the complex or regions near the western extent of the visible solar disk continue beyond the limb.

Above Earth, the geomagnetic field began the period at active levels, as weak CME effects from the previous 24 hours continued in progress. The beginning of the 1st saw an increase to severe storm levels, after a second CME arrived at the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) on the 30th around 22:21 UTC with a subsequent Sudden Impulse (SI) to Earths magnetic field (35nT measured at Boulder) at 23:07 UTC. A single major storm period followed, before conditions decreased to active and then again to quiet. The forecast through October 4th: The geomagnetic field is expected to be quiet to unsettled on the 2nd as CME effects wane. The 3rd and 4th should see mostly quiet conditions. Stay tuned...

To monitor solar flare activity minute by minute, visit the "Today's Space Weather" page of NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center (www.swpc.noaa.gov/today.html).

To learn more about the sun and to stay current on solar activity, visit the mission home pages of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) (sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov), the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) (sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov), the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) (www.srl.caltech.edu/ACE), and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) (stereo.gsfc.nasa.gov).

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Monday, October 01, 2012

AR 1583s M1 Flare on Sept 30th...


The above image was taken September 30th at 04:33:00 UTC by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). This was during the time of a M1 solar ex-ray event, produced by Active Region 1583 (AR 1583), on the western (right) limb. The displayed image combined the AIA observations at 94, 131, and 171 Angstroms. Image Credit: SDO/AIA

For the end of September 29th and most of September 30th, the solar activity has been at moderate levels. Active Region 1583 (AR 1583) produced an isolated M1 solar x-ray event on the 30th at 04:33 UTC. AR 1583 had grown rapidly, however it is only hours away from rotating off the solar disk and out of view. The remaining active regions on the disk remained stable, producing a few low level C-class events. New AR 1584 was numbered, and as of this writing, had only produced one low level C-class event. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were observed. The forecast through October 3rd: The solar activity is expected to be at low levels with a slight chance for continued M-class activity for the 1st and 2nd. A return to low levels is expected on the 3rd, as the active region cluster, located in the northwest quadrant, rotates around the west limb.

Here at home, the geomagnetic field has been at quiet to active levels. The enhanced activity was due to the arrival of a CME from the 27th. On the 30th at around 11:00 UTC, measurements, from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft, indicated the arrival of this CME. At 11:38 UTC, a sudden impluse of 15 nT was measured by the Boulder magnetometer, as the CME reached Earth. Solar wind velocities increased very little with this initial phase of the CME, increasing from around 280 - 320 km/s. The total interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) increased as the CME arrived, with sustained periods of negative Bz. However, with the lower than expected solar wind speeds, very little geomagnetic effects have been observed. The forecast through October 3rd: The geomagnetic field is expected to be a quiet to active levels with minor storm periods possible on the 1st, as effects of today's CME continue. Quiet to unsettled levels are expected on the 2nd as CME effects wane. A return to predominantly quiet levels is expected on the 3rd. Stay tuned...

To monitor solar flare activity minute by minute, visit the "Today's Space Weather" page of NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center (www.swpc.noaa.gov/today.html).

To learn more about the sun and to stay current on solar activity, visit the mission home pages of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) (sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov), the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) (sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov), the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) (www.srl.caltech.edu/ACE), and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) (stereo.gsfc.nasa.gov).

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